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Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

  • Scut Farkus's Davy Crockett Hat Wasn't Popular Until The '50s on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#1) Scut Farkus's Davy Crockett Hat Wasn't Popular Until The '50s

    Davy Crockett's famous coonskin cap makes several appearances in the movie. It's first worn by Ralphie's father during a fantasy sequence in which Ralphie saves his frontier-era family from bad guys with his Red Ryder gun; its second appearance is atop the head of bully Scut Farkus. For a movie made in the 1980s, the hat symbolized boyhood from a bygone era and seemed an apt costuming detail. In 1940, however, someone wearing a faux raccoon pelt on their head would have been unusual.

    Davy Crockett was a real frontiersman and folk hero who lived during the late 1700s and early 1800s, but his famous hat - made out of a raccoon with an intact tail - didn't enter pop culture until the mid-1950s. Walt Disney was behind the trend thanks to a five-part television series about Crockett, which gave hundreds of young boys a sudden desire to dress like the hero. The hat mania continued into 1955 as Disney assembled the series into a feature movie called Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier. The hats were so popular, the National Museum of American History claimed people purchased around 5,000 hats a day during the 1950s.

  • The Radio Flyer Wagons Displayed In The Higbee's Window Are From The 1970s on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#9) The Radio Flyer Wagons Displayed In The Higbee's Window Are From The 1970s

    The movie opens as a crowd gathers around the holiday window displays of Higbee's department store to marvel at the selection of toys. In addition to Ralphie's coveted Red Ryder, the display includes working train sets, wood sleds, and several Radio Flyer wagons.

    Radio Steel & Manufacturing introduced its first steel Radio Flyer wagon in 1930, so the classic toy would have been an era-appropriate toy for Ralphie and his friends. The specific models that appear in the movie, however, were manufactured during the 1970s. Radio Flyer wagons from the 1940s featured different branding on the side, with a classic-looking typeface and silver colored caps on the wheels. The 1970s models, like those seen in the movie, featured red caps on the wheels and more modern lettering.

    Not only are the wagons out of place, but the Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls appear to be more modern versions as well. Raggedy Ann has been around since 1915, but the ones included in the film appear to be those made by the Knickerbocker Toy Co., which manufactured the dolls between 1963 and 1982.

  • Mrs. Parker's Permed Hairdo Is From The 1980s on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#4) Mrs. Parker's Permed Hairdo Is From The 1980s

    As a loving mother to two young boys and wife to a man whose idea of good taste includes fishnet-clad leg lamps, Mrs. Parker spends much of the film just as frazzled as her hair. In the late 1930s or early 1940s, however, her hair style would have looked entirely out of place. A period appropriate woman's hair style would have not featured bangs, and would have been carefully styled with every hair in place.

    Although curls were in, they were not the tight curls Mrs. Parker wears. They were rolled curls that were soft and sleek like those worn by Ralphie's teacher, Miss Shields. Most women at the time also wore their hair short and pinned back away from the face. Mrs. Parker's look is more appropriate for the 1980s, when the movie was made, as big hair was in and kinky permanent waves were all the rage.

  • Ralphie’s Glasses Were Not Invented Until The '80s  on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#7) Ralphie’s Glasses Were Not Invented Until The '80s

    Ralphie's round frames are a signature part of his bespectacled look. After being repeatedly told he'll shoot his eye out with the Red Ryder BB gun he covets so desperately, his glasses are knocked off his head after firing his dream Christmas present for the first time. Unable to see, Ralphie accidentally destroys his glasses, taking one wrong step and crunching them under his winter boots. He lies to his parents about how they broke and escapes punishment.

    While people in 1939 had access to a variety of eyeglasses, the style of hinge that appears on Ralphie's glasses was invented in the 1980s. A shot of Ralphie's broken glasses lying in the snow shows the frames have a three-barrel hinge with a screw - the type of hinge that operates like door hinges. According to one optician, the frames appear to be Liberty Legend frames, which were popular at the time the movie was filmed.

  • Segregation Was Still Very Much A Part Of Public Schools During The Story's Time Period on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#3) Segregation Was Still Very Much A Part Of Public Schools During The Story's Time Period

    Throughout the movie, Ralphie's classmates prove to be a rambunctious bunch, annoying the teacher with novelty teeth and daring one another to lick frozen flag poles. The class includes a few African American children, and while this is commonplace today (and in 1983, when the movie was released), real-life classrooms from the film's time period would have looked much different because of segregation. Despite three post-Civil War amendments to the Constitution establishing rights for African Americans, the Supreme Court continued to pass laws limiting these freedoms.

    In 1896, Plessy v. Ferguson declared segregation constitutional and allowed the creation of "separate but equal" establishments. This ruling not only applied to schools, but also public transportation, churches, and even cemeteries. While laws supporting segregation came to be known as Jim Crow laws in Southern states, racial inequality was not limited to the South alone. Even Ralphie's state of Indiana would have been affected.

    A few court cases initiated by the NAACP in the 1930s and 1940s challenged segregation in schools, but it wasn't until Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 that the Supreme Court finally ruled school segregation unconstitutional. Subsequent court cases and protests led to the 1964 passage of the Civil Rights Act, which put a legal end to segregation.

  • Scut Farkus Sports A Type Of Braces That Weren’t Invented Until The '70s  on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#6) Scut Farkus Sports A Type Of Braces That Weren’t Invented Until The '70s

    School bully Scut Farkus terrorizes Ralphie and his friends throughout the movie. His prominently displayed braces make him comically menacing while simultaneously reminding us he's still just a kid - despite being feared by all the local children.

    Braces have been around since long before 1940, so their appearance in this particular period piece isn't unusual. However, the type of braces Scut wears are bonded to the teeth and were not around until the 1970s. If they were authentic to the time period, the wire would have been wrapped around each individual tooth and may not have been made of stainless steel.

    By bonding the mesh backside of the braces to the enamel of the teeth, dentists were able to give patients freedom from so much metal in their mouths. This technique is still used by orthodontists today, which is why Scut's menacing braces look so much like modern dental work.

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A Christmas Story is a family comedy film directed by Bob Clark. It was released on the Christmas holiday in 1983 and was adapted from a semi-fiction anecdote published by Jean Shepherd in 1966, and some of the stories in the movie come from his book published in 1971. The movie tells the boy's perseverance and adult's absurd behavior, the audience will laugh in mild humor and pungent irony.

The random tool lists 14 inaccuracies in A Christmas Story that was a popular movie, although the era of the movie has never been explicitly mentioned, people infer that the movie set up in the 1940s based on many details and features in the movie.

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