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Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

  • 'Shadow of the Vampire' Tells A Fictional Story Of The 'Nosferatu' Production  on Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

    (#10) 'Shadow of the Vampire' Tells A Fictional Story Of The 'Nosferatu' Production 

    The making of Nosferatu also has its own movie, Shadow of the Vampire, which features John Malkovich as director F.W. Murnau. Willem Dafoe plays Count Orlok, an actual vampire who poses as actor Max Schreck. The film veers between horror and outright comedy as the film crew tries to accommodate the whims of its ambitious director and bizarre star.

    In Shadow, the crew is told Schreck is so committed to his part that he'll never break character and only film at night. One night, Albin Grau (Udo Kier) asks Schreck what he thinks about Stoker's novel. The vampire's response is one of the more interesting and moving parts of the film: 

    It made me sad... Dracula hasn't had servants in 400 years and then a man comes to his ancestral home, and he must convince him that he... that he is like the man. He has to feed him, when he himself hasn't eaten food in centuries. Can he even remember how to buy bread? How to select cheese and wine? And then he remembers the rest of it. How to prepare a meal, how to make a bed. He remembers his first glory, his armies, his retainers, and what he is reduced to. The loneliest part of the book comes... when the man accidentally sees Dracula setting his table.

  • Florence Balcombe Stoker Did Approve A Number Of ‘Dracula’ Plays on Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

    (#7) Florence Balcombe Stoker Did Approve A Number Of ‘Dracula’ Plays

    Stoker's widow wasn't against all adaptations of his novel, just Nosferatu because it was unauthorized. She gave permission for Dracula to be performed as a play in Dublin in 1924.

    Three years later, the play was introduced to the US for the Broadway stage. It played for a year in New York with newcomer Bela Lugosi cast as the Count. It was a hit with audiences, and the show toured the country for another two years, all with Mrs. Stoker's blessing.

  • 'Nosferatu' Has Had Its Own Remake And Continues To Influence Vampires In Film  on Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

    (#9) 'Nosferatu' Has Had Its Own Remake And Continues To Influence Vampires In Film 

    Despite the success of Dracula, Nosferatu has never been forgotten. Instead, it's only gotten more popular, and, like Dracula, it has been remade.

    In 1979, director Werner Herzog released Nosferatu the Vampyre, with Klaus Kinski as Count Orlok. By the time Herzog created his version, Dracula had fallen out of copyright in Germany. As it was now in the public domain, Herzog restored the original character names. 

    Nosferatu's Count Orlok has also influenced other vampires in movie history. In Bram Stoker's Dracula by Francis Ford Coppola, Gary Oldman's Count Dracula is a mix between Lugosi and Schreck, and Taika Waititi's What We Do in the Shadows has one vampire, Petyr, who shares a distinct resemblance to Count Orlok. 

  • Prana Films, The Company That Produced 'Nosferatu,' Was Cofounded By A European Occultist on Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

    (#1) Prana Films, The Company That Produced 'Nosferatu,' Was Cofounded By A European Occultist

    In 1921, businessman Enrico Dieckmann and partner Albin Grau founded Prana Films. Grau was a member of the Fraternitas Saturni, a sect that practiced many of Aleister Crowley's teachings. Both men were keen on producing films to promote occult ideas, and Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror was to be their first. Grau was also the film's production artist, and his beliefs influenced the expressionistic look and overall spirit of the film. 

    However, the filmmakers never got permission for their loose version of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Ultimately, they declared bankruptcy in order to avoid litigation for copyright infringement from the author's widow, Florence Balcombe Stoker. 

  • The Film Was Allegedly Inspired By A Romanian Peasant Who Believed His Father Was A Vampire on Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

    (#2) The Film Was Allegedly Inspired By A Romanian Peasant Who Believed His Father Was A Vampire

    Nosferatu as we know it may not have existed without the horrors of WWI as an influence. Albin Grau was a soldier on the Serbian front while serving in the German army. It was there that he met a farmer who told him his father had become a vampire. This story was the seed for Nosferatu, which took much of its plotline from Bram Stoker's Dracula.

    Grau was not the only member of the project to have participated in WWI. Nosferatu director F. W. Murnau and lead actor Max Schreck both saw action during WWI, and their experiences color the film.

    As a nod to the conflict, Nosferatu is brimming with fog and rats, dangerous elements all-too-familiar to veterans. Fog and smoke obscured the battlefields, and rats were constant pests and carriers of disease. Like Orlok, their presence was accompanied by mass illness, and Orlok himself appears to have more in common with cadavers and rodents than the handsomely described Count Dracula.

  • 'Nosferatu' Diverged From Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula' In A Few Key Ways on Random 'Nosferatu' Blatantly Defied Copyright Laws To Become An Illegal, Vampiric Cinematic Masterpiec

    (#3) 'Nosferatu' Diverged From Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula' In A Few Key Ways

    Though based on Stoker's Dracula, Nosferatu differs from its source material in a few key ways. When Count Dracula became Count Orlok, his bites no longer turned his prey into new vampires, but simply ended their lives. And whereas Stoker's Dracula is only weakened by sunlight, Count Orlok is disintegrated by it.

    In this sense, Nosferatu had a greater impact on future vampire lore than Dracula, as the nature of vampire bites and vampires' lethal vulnerability to sunlight would be shared by such films and TV series as Interview with the Vampire, True Blood, and Salem's Lot. These series feature handsome and beguiling vampires, which is more akin to Dracula than Nosferatu. However, other works of fiction play with the idea that, as a vampire reaches extreme old age, they bear greater resemblance to Orlok than they do Dracula. This is seen in films like Blade II, What We Do in the Shadows, and Dracula Untold.

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Who would not like these cold and beautiful vampire characters? The vampire characters appeared in various fiction books and even some lore and historical records hundreds of years ago. Vampires movies have bewitched audiences for a long time. Nosferatu is an old silent German horror film about vampires, it was an adaptation of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula, but that was unauthorized and unofficial. Although the writer of the novel won the lawsuit, the film was still released.

Nosferatu is an influential vampiric cinematic masterpiece. There is some information about Nosferatu history, you can find 10 entries on this page, the movie blatantly defied copyright laws to become illegal.

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